LE PHO (Hadong, 1907 - Paris, 2001). Bouquet...

Lot 87
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25 000 - 35 000 EUR
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Result : 31 000 EUR

LE PHO (Hadong, 1907 - Paris, 2001). Bouquet...

LE PHO (Hadong, 1907 - Paris, 2001).
Bouquet of yellow chrysanthemums and foliage in a woven basket.
Silk painting signed lower right.
Top. : 55 cm - Width : 42 cm (at sight)


Le Pho was born on August 2, 1907 in Hadong near Hanoi, then capital of French Indochina. Son of the Viceroy of Tonkin (Tông-dôc), the young child benefited from a privileged education open to calligraphy and painting by scholars.
From 1925 to 1930, he studied at the Hanoi School of Fine Arts, newly created by Victor Tardieu, Nguyen Nam Son and Joseph Inguimberty. This period, in which the analysis of the great Western masters and traditional Asian techniques are mixed, is crucial for the young man's artistic awakening. The school became the fertile ground for a whole generation of brilliant artists who took advantage of this happy syncretism to create a new art, a balance between two opposing cultures. In the colonial context of the time, the cultural mix and the status of artist allowed this young promotion the possibility of individual expression and social emancipation.
Victor Tardieu, aware of the young painter's abilities, invited him to accompany him as an assistant at the 1931 Paris Colonial Exhibition and pushed him to join the Paris School of Fine Arts. He took advantage of this period to travel to Belgium, the Netherlands and Italy. This Grand Tour continues until Beijing where he settles in 1934 to study traditional Chinese painting.
After a first resounding exhibition in Hanoi in 1933, Le Pho moves to Paris where he devotes himself to painting. Initially influenced by the primitive and Renaissance masters, the artist revisits the iconography of the Virgin and Child where academic references and millenary oriental know-how are intermingled.
In 1941 and 1943, he crossed paths with Albert Marquet and Henri Matisse who introduced him to French avant-garde painting. His style, in perpetual evolution, will always keep this small poetic music revealing his Vietnamese heritage.
Thus, in the 1960s, his brush captures for eternity the evanescent colour of bouquets of flowers and transforms the immutable theme of still life into a double reverence for the Dutch Golden Age and xieyi watercolours.
He passes on this passion to his son, the artist and draftsman Pierre Le-Tan, who in turn will never cease to perfect the ancestral techniques on behalf of the New Yorker or the writer Patrick Modiano.
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